Tenancy types

Home > Housing > Tenancy types



Assured shorthold tenancies (ASTs)

The most common form of private rented tenancy is an AST. Most new tenancies are automatically this type.

A tenancy can be an AST if all of the following apply:

  • The tenancy is through a private landlord (not a local council or housing association).
  • The tenancy started on or after 15 January 1989.
  • The property is the tenant’s main accommodation
  • The landlord doesn’t live in the property.
     

A tenancy can’t be an AST if:

  • It began or was agreed before 15 January 1989.
  • The rent is more than £100,000 a year.
  • The rent is less than £250 a year (less than £1,000 in London).
  • It’s a business tenancy or tenancy of licensed premises.
  • The property is a holiday let.
  • The landlord is a local council.

If you want advice on your tenancy please contact Housing Services.


Other tenancies

There are other tenancies that aren’t as common as ASTs, including:
 

Excluded tenancies or licences

An excluded tenancy or licence may exist if the tenant lodges with their landlord and shares rooms with them, like a kitchen or bathroom. These tenants usually have less protection from eviction with this type of agreement.
 

Assured tenancies

Tenancies starting between 15 January 1989 and 27 February 1997 may be assured. Tenants will have increased protection from eviction with this type of agreement.
 

Regulated tenancies

Tenancies starting before 15 January 1989 may be regulated. You’ll have increased protection from eviction and can apply for a ‘fair rent’.


Houses in multiple occupation

Your home is a house in multiple occupation (HMO) if both of the following apply:

  • At least 3 tenants live there, forming more than 1 household.
  • You share toilet, bathroom or kitchen facilities with other tenants.
     

Your home is a large HMO if all of the following apply:

  • It’s at least 3 storeys high.
  • At least 5 tenants live there, forming more than 1 household.
  • You share toilet, bathroom or kitchen facilities with other tenants.
     

A household is either a single person or members of the same family who live together. A family includes people who are:

  • Married or living together - including people in same-sex relationships.
  • Relatives or half-relatives, e.g. grandparents, aunts, uncles, siblings.
  • Step-parents and step-children.